Forgot your password?

Philanthropy

Sigma Lambda Gamma Sorority Donates Over $14,000 to Breast Cancer Research
SLG celebrates “Pink Out” Success Across the Country
 

Sigma Lambda Gamma National Sorority, Inc. supports a variety of charitable organizations as a part of our community service commitment. As a national organization, we are proud to dedicate our philanthropic efforts to our national causes, Breast Cancer Awareness and the TRIO programs. Sorority entities conduct and participate in extraordinary programming events that are designed to bring about public awareness and education on these topics. In addition to our national service programs, our organization knows no limits in the quality and innovativeness of seminars and workshops which are facilitated by our membership.



Women, children and societal issues serve as a focal point for the programming efforts of our collegiate and alumnae groups. On the regional and local levels, chapters and alumnae associations identify important issues within their respective communities to create a positive change for the next generation. It is our goal to collaborate with many campus organizations and philanthropic groups to share the belief in community service and instill a compassion for the hardships faced within our global family. 


TRiO Programs

www2.ed.gov

The Federal TRIO Programs (TRIO) are Federal outreach and student services programs designed to identify and provide services for individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds. TRIO includes eight programs targeted to serve and assist low-income individuals, first-generation college students, and individuals with disabilities to progress through the academic pipeline from middle school to postbaccalaureate programs. TRIO also includes a training program for directors and staff of TRIO projects.

The recipients of the grants, depending on the specific program, are institutions of higher education, public and private agencies and organizations including community-based organizations with experience in serving disadvantaged youth and secondary schools. Combinations of such institutions, agencies, and organizations may also apply for grants. These entities plan, develop and carry out the services for students. While individual students are served by these entities, they may not apply for grants under these programs. Additionally, in order to be served by one of these programs, a student must be eligible to receive services and be accepted into a funded project that serves the institution or school that student is attending or the area in which the student lives.

 

Breast Cancer Awareness

www.breastcancer.org

Sigma Lambda Gamma and its member groups actively support the important societal issue of Breast Cancer Awareness. Our support of this cause comes in various avenues: from fundraising campaigns; educational workshops to create awareness; active participation in run/walk events; volunteer participation with organizations; or a combination of these forms. The two primary programs our organization supports in respects to breast cancer awareness include, but are not limited to: Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation and Y-ME National Breast Cancer Organization.

Every three minutes a woman in the United States is diagnosed with breast cancer. In 2004, it is estimated that about 216,000 new cases of invasive breast cancer will be diagnosed, along with 59,390 new cases of non-invasive breast cancer. And 40,000 women are expected to die from this disease.

Breast cancer incidence in women has increased from one in 20 in 1960 to one in 8 today.

The exact cause of breast cancer is not known. Factors that can increase a woman’s risk include heredity, early puberty, late childbearing, obesity, and lifestyle factors such as heavy alcohol consumption and smoking. Most breast cancers occur in women over the age of 50, and women over 60 are at the highest risk.

A woman’s risk for developing breast cancer increases if her mother, sister, daughter, or two or more other close relatives, such as cousins, have a history of breast cancer, especially at a young age. However, 85% of women who develop breast cancer have NO known family history of the disease.